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Tag Archives: job seekers

The Perils of The Perfect Interview


perils perfect interviewThe paradox of the flawless record.

This was the title of Seth Godin’s Sunday (9/4/2016) blog post.

I am not even going to attempt to concisely summarize it’s precise meaning, so here you go:

The paradox of the flawless record

If your work has never been criticized, it’s unlikely you have any work.

Creating work is the point, though, which means that in order to do something that matters, you’re going to be criticized.

If your goal is to be universally liked and respected and understood, then, it must mean your goal is to not do something that matters.

Which requires hiding.

Hiding, of course, isn’t the point.

Hence the paradox. You don’t want to be criticized and you do want to matter.

The solution: Create work that gets criticized. AND, have the discernment to tell the difference between useful criticism (rare and precious) and the stuff worth ignoring (everything else).

Why is this important for you to read?Continue Reading…

3 Strategies to Help Combat Ageism in Your Job Search


combat ageismThe majority of job search clients we work with are between the ages of 45 and 65 years old.


We hear this word a couple of dozen times per week from clients. I hear it cited as a reason for job seekers experiencing no results or poor results in their job search as an Expert Moderator for LinkedIn’s Job Seeker Premium Group.

I hear the frustration and pain from experienced job seekers day in and day out:

“Employers want to hire a 20-something year old, with the experience of a 50-year old, at the price of an 18-year old.”

“45 is the new 65. And no one calls me because of it.”

“I can see the HR Manager’s shoulders slump down when I walk in, knowing they realized I’m older than I sounded on the phone interview.”

This pain is real.

Ageism (as sexism, racism, and other -isms) in the job search is real. And the age-related rejection, real or perceived, is debilitating otherwise competent job seekers across the globe.

What are you supposed to do if you believe ageism is a problem in your job search?Continue Reading…

12 Unspoken Reasons Why Recruiters Are Not Calling You Back


12 secrets getting recruiters call backI get constant inquiries about how to work with recruiters, as well as how to get recruiters to return my clients’ phone call.

At the beginning of your career, job opportunities likely came by interacting with a company’s Human Resources department directly… However, as you have worked your way up to the executive level, the process can often be a bit different. It’s not uncommon to start running into more agencies and headhunters than you did before.

When it comes to higher level positions, companies often outsource the task of hiring to external recruiters who get paid by the employer to find the best candidate for the job.

In response to the inquiries I have received, I’ve put together some tips to avoid misunderstandings during the hiring process, which may also even lead to your next great job opportunity.

Frustrated by search firm recruiters not calling you back when you have submitted your resume to them?

Feel you’re perfect for the job they posted, you know you can do it, but baffled by the fact they have not returned your call?

Effective executive recruiter relationships can play an instrumental part in career advances for the rising professional and the established executive. Whether you’ve worked with executive recruiters before or this is your first time, there is a lot to know about how to build effective working relationships with recruiters. To have an effective relationship with an executive recruiter, it is important to understand the business’s business model and role you play as a potential candidate represented by an executive recruiter. Job seekers that fail to recognize ‘how it works’ with an executive recruiter often find themselves frustrated and unrepresented.

Read on if you are open to honest, tough talk, you are serious about optimizing your job search time and you are prepared to do something about it.

Here are my top 3 (of 12) reasons for Why Recruiters Don’t Call You Back:Continue Reading…

7 Straightforward Reasons You Weren’t Hired


reasons you weren't hiredAm I overqualified?

Is it my age?

I get asked all of the time by job seekers why they weren’t hired for a job they applied for. I heard the story: You’ve been on a number of interviews and sent out more applications than you can count, but still no luck. If you hear back at all, it’s often a “thanks for your time, but we’re not interested” or “you’re not the right fit for this role.” I know that it can be frustrating and disheartening. While everyone’s situation is unique, I may be able to shed some light… Here are 7 reasons why you likely didn’t get the job, that you can examine, and – hopefully – turn your luck around so you don’t keep receiving the same response.Continue Reading…

7 Lame Reasons HR May Not Call Back After You Rocked the Interview


reasons HR may not call backI receive emails almost daily from frustrated job seekers asking me what they should do when they don’t receive any follow up from potential employers after a job interview. Frustrated, mad, disappointed, offended, tired… can you relate to any of those feelings? Those sentiments often fill my inbox, along with the question, “What is happening when HR doesn’t call me back?”

When you send a resume through an impersonal job posting, you are generally more reasonable in that you do not expect a “no thanks” response. However, after going through several rounds of interviews (especially when you think you’ve nailed it!) only to receive an eerie silence with no subsequent follow-up, I imagine it leaves you feeling outraged and frustrated. I can’t say I blame you and it always makes me sad. As a former 3rd party recruiter, I did experience it, also. I had candidates go through the process and then the corporate recruiter would go silent.

Pulling from my 13 years of recruiting experience, I wanted to shed some light on what is actually happening behind the scenes when a recruiter drops the ball throughout the recruitment and interview process. While it has become a daunting task for employers to manage the communication process, that isn’t an excuse to fail to keep a candidate in progress informed.

Please know that I do not believe any of these explanations justify the behavior. But if you can have an inkling as to what goes on inside these processes, you can realize it is not personal and recruiters are not intentionally being sneaky. In most cases, it is just human nature, incompetence, being overwhelmed or lack of information that is the cause of the lack of response. I find knowing it is not personal can ease the frustration.

Through my recruiting experience, this is what I came to realize:Continue Reading…

The Problem With the “Can You Take a Quick Look at My Profile” Request


take quick look profile requestAt least 4-5 times per week, I’m asked by new LinkedIn connections, and other people I don’t know, to take a quick peek at their profile and let the requestor know if I have any suggestions on improvements they can make.

Unfortunately, this isn’t so easy. In fact, there are several problems that can occur from such requests and it can actually be a great disservice to job seekers. Even worse, if you ask inexperienced job seekers to take a look at your resume you may just be shooting yourself in the foot.

Here’s why you shouldn’t be asking people to take a quick look at your LinkedIn Profile and make suggestions:Continue Reading…

Should You Go Back to School for Your Master’s Degree? 5 Points to Consider


master's degreeAfter being on the job hunt for a while with no prospective offers or interviews on the horizon, executives often times wonder whether or not they should go back to school to obtain an advanced degree. Same conundrum can happen to recent college graduates when they struggle to find a suitable first job. Job seekers from both demographics feel that perhaps a Master’s Degree (or any advanced degree) will improve their chances of getting hired.

While this method may work for some, and I am a huge fan of lifelong learning in general, the bottom line is going back to school as a job landing tactic is often not a wise-move. There are many considerations to evaluate before deciding to go back to school as a tactic for landing a new or better position. Below you’ll find some key points that may help you make the best decision for you.Continue Reading…

41 Mistakes that Job Seekers Make which Kill Their Career Prospects and Sabotage Their Job Search

Struggling with your job search? Not seeing results that you want, but not sure why? Review this list and if you 10 or more of these reasons resonate with you, then we need to chat about what you can fix to get results (you can sign up for a call on the right):

(1) Go into a new field without major research
(2) Send the same thank you note to all interviewers
(3) Think they have to have 100% clarity as to what they want before they start to look
(4) Only submit to job postings and never reach out to people at companies directly
(5) Assume the tactics that worked for their job search three years ago will work for them nowContinue Reading…